adoption without parental consent

Do I need parental consent to place my baby for adoption if I am a minor?

The answer, in most cases, is no.

Like most laws, it depends on the state you reside in. (See section below for states where adoption without parental consent for minors is permitted.)

Choosing adoption for your baby is tough decision for any mother, but it’s often more difficult when you are underage or a minor who is still dependent on their parents.

The biggest worry of underage women that come to us is, “Can I give up my baby for adoption without my parents know?”

Legally in most cases you can, but going through it alone with no support system is not ideal.

Resources and Support

There is a variety of emotional support that birth mothers can find birth mother resources.

There are local and online groups of birth parents where you can seek the advice of those who have been your shoes and organizations dedicated to the helping birth mothers.

With adoption, the right choice can also be the hardest choice.

At Adopt Connect, we do everything we can to make the use of appropriate mental health services part of every adoption plan, but following through with that plan is ultimately in the hands of the individual birth mother.

Click Here for resources and support.

States where adoption without parental consent for minors is permitted:

Consider contacting an adoption coordinator if you have questions or need information.

Alabama – Minors May Consent.
Alaska – Minors May Consent/State makes no distinction between minor and adult parents.
Arizona – Minors May Consent.
Arkansas – Minors May Consent/State makes no distinction between minor and adult parents.
California – Minors May Consent.
Colorado – Minors May Consent.
Connecticut – Court-Appointed Counsel.
Delaware – Minors May Consent.
Dist. of Columbia – Minors May Consent.
Florida – Minors May Consent/State makes no distinction between minor and adult parents.
Georgia – Minors May Consent.
Hawaii – Minors May Consent.
Idaho – Minors May Consent.
Illinois – Minors May Consent.
Indiana – Minors May Consent.
Iowa – Minors May Consent/State makes no distinction between minor and adult parents.
Kansas – Minors May Consent.
Kentucky – Court-Appointed Counsel.
Louisiana – Parental Consent/Court may waive parental consent if the minor is “sufficiently mature and well informed” or the adoption is in the infant’s best interest.
Maine – Minors May Consent/State makes no distinction between minor and adult parents.
Maryland – Minors May Consent.
Massachusetts – Minors May Consent/State makes no distinction between minor and adult parents.
Michigan – Parental Consent.
Minnesota – Parental Consent.
Mississippi – Minors May Consent.
Missouri – Court-Appointed Counsel.
Montana – Legal Counsel.
Nebraska – Minors May Consent/State makes no distinction between minor and adult parents.
Nevada – Minors May Consent.
New Hampshire – Minors May Consent/Court may require parental consent for a minor to place a child for adoption.
New Jersey – Minors May Consent.
New Mexico – Minors May Consent.
New York – Minors May Consent.
North Carolina – Minors May Consent/State makes no distinction between minor and adult parents.
North Dakota – Minors May Consent.
Ohio – Minors May Consent.
Oklahoma – Minors May Consent/Minor must be at least 16 years old.
Oregon – Minors May Consent/State makes no distinction between minor and adult parents.
Pennsylvania – Parental Notification.
Rhode Island – Parental Consent.
South Carolina – Minors May Consent.
South Dakota – Minors May Consent/State makes no distinction between minor and adult parents.
Tennessee – Minors May Consent.
Texas – Minors May Consent/State makes no distinction between minor and adult parents.
Utah – Minors May Consent.
Vermont – Minors May Consent.
Virginia – Minors May Consent.
Washington – Court-Appointed Counsel
West Virginia – Minors May Consent.
Wisconsin – Minors May Consent/State makes no distinction between minor and adult parents.
Wyoming – Minors May Consent.

Highlights

  • 40 states and the District of Columbia allow minors to place their child for adoption, either explicitly or by making no distinction between minor and adult parents.
    • 28 states and the District of Columbia explicitly allow minors to consent to their child’s adoption.
    • 12 states make no distinction between minor and adult parents.
  • 10 states require the involvement of an adult in the adoption process.
    • 5 states require minors to be represented by legal counsel or require courts to appoint counsel in adoption hearings.
    • 4 states require minors’ parents to consent, and 1 state requires that the parents be notified, when a child is placed for adoption.

Every situation is different, so if you are thinking about adoption but have questions about it, consider contacting an adoption coordinator who can get you help tailored to your needs.

 

 

Resource: www.guttmacher.org

 

Leave a Reply